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24-Aug-2017 16:08

A "large" or "stack", it is usually a reference to a multiple of

A "large" or "stack", it is usually a reference to a multiple of $1,000 (such as "fifty large" meaning $50,000).The $100 note is nicknamed "Benjamin", "Benji", "Ben", or "Franklin" (after Benjamin Franklin), "C-note" (C being the Roman numeral for 100), "Century note" or "bill" (e.g. The $50 note is occasionally called a "yardstick" or a "grant" (after President Ulysses S. The $20 note is referred to as a "double sawbuck", "Jackson" (after Andrew Jackson), or "double eagle".It was also popular throughout Eastern Europe, where it led to the current Romanian and Moldovan currency being called leu (literally "lion").Among the English-speaking community, the coin came to be popularly known as lion dollar – and is the origin of the name dollar. dollar (but not to the dollars of other countries).

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A "large" or "stack", it is usually a reference to a multiple of $1,000 (such as "fifty large" meaning $50,000).

The $100 note is nicknamed "Benjamin", "Benji", "Ben", or "Franklin" (after Benjamin Franklin), "C-note" (C being the Roman numeral for 100), "Century note" or "bill" (e.g. The $50 note is occasionally called a "yardstick" or a "grant" (after President Ulysses S. The $20 note is referred to as a "double sawbuck", "Jackson" (after Andrew Jackson), or "double eagle".

It was also popular throughout Eastern Europe, where it led to the current Romanian and Moldovan currency being called leu (literally "lion").

Among the English-speaking community, the coin came to be popularly known as lion dollar – and is the origin of the name dollar. dollar (but not to the dollars of other countries).

The term eagle was used in the Coinage Act of 1792 for the denomination of ten dollars, and subsequently was used in naming gold coins. Joachim's Valley, now Jáchymov; then part of the Kingdom of Bohemia, now part of the Czech Republic).

Paper currency less than one dollar in denomination, known as "fractional currency", was also sometimes pejoratively referred to as "shinplasters". Joachimstaler was later shortened to the German Taler, a word that eventually found its way into Danish and Swedish as daler, Norwegian as dalar and daler, Dutch as daler or daalder, Ethiopian as ታላሪ (talari), Hungarian as tallér, Italian as tallero, and English as dollar.

These other coins are more fully described in Coins of the United States dollar. dollar may therefore be described as the unit of account of the United States. Section 9 of that act authorized the production of various coins, including "DOLLARS OR UNITS—each to be of the value of a Spanish milled dollar as the same is now current, and to contain three hundred and seventy-one grains and four sixteenth parts of a grain of pure, or four hundred and sixteen grains of standard silver".

The Constitution provides that "a regular Statement and Account of the Receipts and Expenditures of all public Money shall be published from time to time". The word "dollar" is one of the words in the first paragraph of Section 9 of Article I of the Constitution. Section 20 of the act provided, "That the money of account of the United States shall be expressed in dollars, or units... In addition to the dollar the coinage act officially established monetary units of mill or one-thousandth of a dollar (symbol ₥), cent or one-hundredth of a dollar (symbol ¢), dime or one-tenth of a dollar, and eagle or ten dollars, with prescribed weights and composition of gold, silver, or copper for each.

,000 (such as "fifty large" meaning ,000).

The 0 note is nicknamed "Benjamin", "Benji", "Ben", or "Franklin" (after Benjamin Franklin), "C-note" (C being the Roman numeral for 100), "Century note" or "bill" (e.g. The note is occasionally called a "yardstick" or a "grant" (after President Ulysses S. The note is referred to as a "double sawbuck", "Jackson" (after Andrew Jackson), or "double eagle".

It was also popular throughout Eastern Europe, where it led to the current Romanian and Moldovan currency being called leu (literally "lion").

Among the English-speaking community, the coin came to be popularly known as lion dollar – and is the origin of the name dollar. dollar (but not to the dollars of other countries).

The term eagle was used in the Coinage Act of 1792 for the denomination of ten dollars, and subsequently was used in naming gold coins. Joachim's Valley, now Jáchymov; then part of the Kingdom of Bohemia, now part of the Czech Republic).

Paper currency less than one dollar in denomination, known as "fractional currency", was also sometimes pejoratively referred to as "shinplasters". Joachimstaler was later shortened to the German Taler, a word that eventually found its way into Danish and Swedish as daler, Norwegian as dalar and daler, Dutch as daler or daalder, Ethiopian as ታላሪ (talari), Hungarian as tallér, Italian as tallero, and English as dollar.

These other coins are more fully described in Coins of the United States dollar. dollar may therefore be described as the unit of account of the United States. Section 9 of that act authorized the production of various coins, including "DOLLARS OR UNITS—each to be of the value of a Spanish milled dollar as the same is now current, and to contain three hundred and seventy-one grains and four sixteenth parts of a grain of pure, or four hundred and sixteen grains of standard silver".

The Constitution provides that "a regular Statement and Account of the Receipts and Expenditures of all public Money shall be published from time to time". The word "dollar" is one of the words in the first paragraph of Section 9 of Article I of the Constitution. Section 20 of the act provided, "That the money of account of the United States shall be expressed in dollars, or units... In addition to the dollar the coinage act officially established monetary units of mill or one-thousandth of a dollar (symbol ₥), cent or one-hundredth of a dollar (symbol ¢), dime or one-tenth of a dollar, and eagle or ten dollars, with prescribed weights and composition of gold, silver, or copper for each.

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The note as "Lincoln", "fin", "fiver" or "five-spot". dollar, used for example in the French text of the Louisiana Purchase.

By the mid-18th century, the lion dollar had been replaced by the Spanish dollar, the famous "piece of eight", which was distributed widely in the Spanish colonies in the New World and in the Philippines. This term, dating to the 18th century, may have originated with the colonial leather trade. The original note was printed in black and green on the back side. Other well-known names of the dollar as a whole in denominations include "greenmail", "green" and "dead presidents" (the last because deceased presidents are pictured on most bills).



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